Action, Adult learning, Nonprofits

Wonder Woman needs her shield.

 

It is kind of like Wonder Woman leaving her lasso of truth around a rock on Themyscira. It’s as if she forgot her vibranium shield in that tower before setting off for London.

And her bracelets of submission? Back in the Paradise Island bathing grotto.

Diana still has her cunning curiosity and empathetic outlook. But her tools of the trade aren’t there to help her take action on saving humanity. She can stand nobly in that foxhole telling Steve Trevor everything she knows about rescuing women and children under siege over yonder. But knowing isn’t doing. The only way this woman can cross “No Man’s Land” is with the full package of knowledge, skills, tools, courage…. and a shield.

This is what comes to mind when I see leaders talk about the big changes they want to see in the world and then organize the same activities done for years. They call together the same people who have been called together before. They lean on experts of the topic of concern  to share what they know.

Here’s the thing. We know so much about adult learning, psychology, behavioral economics, and human development. We know about strategy and outcome-based planning. We have at our fingertips really talented people who know the process to get results that reflect the interests of others.

Our system respects the knowledge of experts and not the experts of knowledge. Paradoxically it relies on content experts and not experts in transferring that content to others.

Too often our lassos and bracelets are left in the closet. Its time to take them out.

Advertisements
Adult learning, Nonprofits

Walk This Way

\
I spent the last five weeks immersed in two experiences. First, my family hosted a 19 year old foster-care “graduate” needing a short term place to stay. “Cam” had been in 32 different placements, was in school, had a 30 hour a week job, and could recite pretty much any detail from Black Panther or High School Musical. He knew a lot about rap artists of his generation. He fell short on knowing much about Grandmaster Flash and Run DMC. Forgivable.

Second, I was creating a daylong workshop for all volunteer nonprofit leaders in rural areas. Designed to cover the major topics of running a small organization, the workshop needed to review key content, invite curiosity, inspire but not overwhelm, and connect people to each other. I delivered the inaugural workshop in Long Beach, Washington on March 10.

Cam and the folks I spent Saturday with have something in common. They both know a lot about some things and nearly nothing about others. What they know, they have learned from experience—hands on, need to know, full body living it. Cam knew exactly how to receive a check, cash it at Safeway (for a fee), and move money onto a pre-paid debit card, or juggle money across several pre-paids since the one-time load limit was $500. He knew nothing about having a bank account, including why you would want one.

The nonprofit volunteers from the poverty action group knew exactly where economically-disadvantaged people were living and how they juggled finding food, clothes, housing vouchers, etc. The “Stop ICE” volunteers recited names, stories, and statistics gathered from resistance activities. Yet most people in the room knew little about the bread and butter topics of nonprofit operations: board recruitment, internal controls, or fundraising beyond the spaghetti dinner. I heard at least three times, “I never thought of that before.”

We live in a world that values mainstream, professionalized knowledge. Adults should have a bank account. Nonprofit leaders should know how to have a strong board, stay compliant, and raise money. At the same time, we should know how to recognize sources of deep knowledge when we see them. Too often we miss solutions because their knowledge doesn’t look like ours.

A teacher once said that a good curriculum is like a strong fence. It goes deep enough to hold the fence firm and runs long enough to cover wide landscapes. The metaphor works for communities as much as curriculum. A healthy community values the deep knowledge of people living within the circumstances society’s solutions set out to solve. Our operational tips and tools allow them to cover a lot of ground faster than they would on their own. We need each other. I’m grateful to have been reminded that.

One thing I know is that life is short
So listen up homeboy, give this a thought
The next time someone’s teaching why don’t you get taught?
It’s like that (what?) and that’s the way it is

– “It’s Like That” by Run DMC

Adult learning, Nonprofits

Upcoming Train the Trainer Series

At Washington Nonprofits, we are really excited to announce our Spring 2018 “Train the Trainer Series,” which starts April 4, 2018. Sessions will be lead by the amazing Guila Muir and Tracy Flynn…. and me, Nancy Bacon. More information is below. Please pass this along to anyone you think would be interested.

Nancy

 


 

Washington Nonprofits
Train the Trainer Series
Spring 2018

Train the Trainer is designed for consultants and learning staff in the nonprofit and public sector who want to strengthen their training practice. Over the course of three sessions led by adult learning experts, we will cover how to train, tips and tools for increased engagement, and how to know if you made a difference. Since learning happens best when you can reflect on your practice with others, we are offering an option for individualized observation and coaching.

Sign up for individual sessions or the series. (When you take the series, you will get a Washington Nonprofits Train the Trainer Series Certificate at the last class.) By the end, you will have greater knowledge and skill, feel more confident, and be a part of a supportive cohort of people committed to the practice of teaching and learning.

 

3-PART SERIES

“Never Fail” Course Design with Guila Muir
April 4, 9:00-12:00pm

Build Your Trainer Toolkit with Tracy Flynn
May 2, 9:00-12:00pm

Train to Make a Difference with Tracy Flynn & Nancy Bacon
May 30, 9:00-12:00pm

Location
Pike/Pine Room
12th Avenue Arts / Capitol Hill Housing
1620 12th Avenue, Suite 206, Seattle WA 98122

Cost

$95/ workshop $280/ series WASHINGTON NONPROFITS MEMBERS
$116/ workshop   $349/ series NON-MEMBERS Joining is easy!

Register here 


April 4, 2018
“NEVER FAIL” COURSE DESIGN

Do you feel overwhelmed while developing a new class or webinar? Does all the content threaten to cover YOU up? Do you simply not know where to begin?

Welcome to Guila Muir’s “Never Fail” Course Design Template. A product of twenty-five years of experimentation and evolution, this template enables you to design active, effective courses that transfer skills into the “real world”. Who knew course design could be so easy?

By the end of this three-hour workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Describe the nine elements of outcome-focused, activity-driven lesson plan.
  2. Create the Purpose and Learning Outcomes of a training session that you will present in the near future.
  3. Explain how you will enable participants to transfer new skills into the “real world”.

NOTE: To participate in this workshop, all participants MUST bring:

  • topic for a training session, workshop, or webinar that you will give soon, or that you have given recently and would like to improve.
  • a typical audience you’d present this to.
  • the probable length of your training session, workshop, or webinar (PLEASE think of a session that would be at least 45 minutes long).

GUILA MUIR is principal of Guila Muir & Associates, a Seattle-based firm specializing in developing professionals’ facilitation, presentation, and training skills. Since 1993, Guila’s engaging, highly energetic style has transformed businesses and organizations across the United States and in Canada. Her clients include Microsoft, Amazon, and hundreds of state agencies and nonprofit organizations. Guila has also worked as an adjunct professor in Seattle University’s Graduate School of Education. She published “Instructional Design That Soars: Shaping What You Know Into Classes That Inspire” in 2013. Since then, it has become an essential tool to develop and deliver effective courses, training sessions, and Webinars.


May 2, 2018
BUILD YOUR TRAINER TOOLKIT

Strategies to increase meaningful participation, engagement and skill-building with any audience

Are you wondering how to step into a classroom and create a learning community? Do want to add more tools to your toolbox when it comes to increasing participation? Through the course of this session, you will learn the connection between motivation, participation, and a deeper engagement in what you are teaching. You will leave with a lot of ideas for activities you can use in training.

By the end of the workshop, you will be able to:

  • Name two ways that you can create a strong learning community.
  • Demonstrate at least one new engagement strategy
  • Describe how to assess and capitalize on the learner’s own motivation

TRACY FLYNN has over 25 years of experience working in education and with nonprofits. She has a broad background in local and national health, welfare, and education institutions. Her mission is to provide training and coaching to build healthy organizations and communities. She has served as a Health Curriculum Specialist with Seattle Public Schools, Training Director with the National CASA Association, and Director of Training with Planned Parenthood of Western Washington. She is currently Regional Consultant with Welcoming Schools and trainer/coach with the Youth Program Quality Improvement Initiative. She also serves as an adjunct faculty member at several universities.


May 30, 2018
TRAIN TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

How to use feedback and evaluation to know if your training had an impact

You taught, but did they learn? Are they doing anything differently because of your training? Their success depends on “learning transfer” and whether your lessons transfer into real results. In this session, we will dig deep into the building blocks of “learning transfer” and how to use feedback and evaluation to know what’s different.

By the end of the session, you will be able to:

  • Name the elements of learning transfer
  • Demonstrate one way to use feedback to see if you are meeting your goals
  • Describe how you could use evaluation to keep learning going past the training (and decrease forgetting!) and strengthen how you teach.

TRACY FLYNN 

NANCY BACON is a teacher and instructional designer who has worked for over 20 years in the nonprofit sector. For the past five years, she has led Washington Nonprofits learning program. She created and led the World Affairs Council’s Global Classroom program, directed an international development NGO in partnership with Afro-Brazilian women in Salvador, Brazil, and taught middle school social studies at the International School Manila. She writes and trains on adult learning through her blog ChunkFlipGuideLaugh.com.

Adult learning, Emotion, Nonprofits

Manipulation or Influence?

 

At a recent conference, I introduced the work of Robert Cialdini, author of Influence and Presuasion. We were talking about how to motivate nonprofit board members, and I shared two possible approaches to moving a board member to raise money:

Option 1: You are on this board because you care about this mission. We really need to raise $10,000 at this event. Every board member should do their part inviting friends and giving funds.

Option 2: You have already shown great courage and commitment by stepping forward into the board member role. Your leadership makes an important difference in our ability to achieve our mission. I am going to ask that you do one more courageous thing and reach out to your friends and invite them to join us in our work.

As participants got involved in an activity, a man pulled me aside to tell me that he was bothered by Option 2. It was manipulative, and he didn’t think that we should be manipulating board members into doing things.

It seemed like a very nonprofit response. A huge body of evidence shows that people are motivated by their emotions. Companies use this research to get consumers to buy their products. (Cialdini gives some interesting examples here.) Wouldn’t it be powerful if nonprofits took what we know about influence and used it for good?

As Jeff Brooks writes on his blog, we don’t avoid emotions in Option 1 since everything we say or do signals some emotion, possibly not the ones we intend.

As Allen Gannett writes in Fast Company, the difference between manipulation and persuasion comes down to one question: is what you are asking in the person’s best interest?

As influence expert Alex Swallow says on a recent podcast, effective influence creates a win-win outcome that lasts.

Boards members by definition should care deeply about the mission of the organization on whose board they serve. It is in their best interest that they are motivated to do anything they can to support the cause they love. I truly believe that board members are the superheroes of our communities, taking on the most important social issues of our time as volunteers.

Beyond nonprofit boards, we hold the power to make lasting change when we move from information sharing to imagination capturing, habit shifting, and action inspiring.  It will take courage to step into this new space. But you have already shown great courage and commitment. Why not do one more courageous thing and give (intentional) influence a try.

Photo by Neil Bates on Unsplash


Upcoming event: I’m speaking on February 1 as a part of the Learning Technology Design conference. In Chunk Flip Guide Laugh: Creating Learning Tools That Lead to Action, we will walk through Discover, Design, and Delivery, and I’ll share some stories behind Washington Nonprofits’ popular toolkits.


 

Adult learning, Nonprofits

Habits and House of Cards: How to bring thinking about habits into a New Year

 

House of Cards left a legacy in our house, #metoo movement aside. A few episodes into the series, my beloved watched Frank Underwood rowing in the basement of his DC townhouse and said, “I want one of those.” (He wasn’t alone.) The object of his desire was a wooden water rower made in Rhode Island. Out with the treadmill, in with the WaterRower.

The training videos are enticing. I quickly decided that I would faux-row-on-the-Charles a daily 40 minutes. Right. My first row lasted 8 painful minutes. I missed my treadmill.

A few months later, I tried this again, this time committing to 12 minutes at 7:15am, five days in a row. I lined up podcasts to distract me from the slowest clock ever. I snuck in a few discrete stretch breaks, but I got through five days. And then another five days. I’m now a few months into a morning row routine. My “coach” holds me accountable: I tell my teen what I rowed while she stares into a bowl of Cheerios, to which she irreverently responds, “Nice job, Nancy.” Strangely that part has become motivating.

I think a lot about habits because ultimately that is what matters in adult learning. It isn’t just about knowing something. It isn’t about doing something once. It is about doing it routinely over time. What habits do we want people to have? How do we nudge people to form them?

Four thoughts on habits:

1. Start small

Charles Duhigg shared a simple graphic for understanding habits in his book, The Power of Habit. Nonprofit boards understand this already: they get to the finance part of the agenda (cue), the room goes silent while the treasurer and executive director talk (routine), and if everyone stays quiet, the finance part of the agenda ends quickly (reward). How do we break that cycle? In “Finance Unlocked for Nonprofits,” board members get a “Pulse” chart with simple questions to ask at each board meeting. The more familiar the routine gets, the more voices are heard.

habit-loop
From The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

2. Do something 5 times

Why five? There is absolutely no research that I know of behind five, but the goal is to do something more than a couple of times. It has to become part of an unconscious routine. Now when 7:13am comes along, I feel the need to move towards rowing. For those nonprofit boards using the “Balance Sheet Pulse,” I hope at the fifth meeting they feel the need to talk about their assets and liabilities because it is what they know to do.

BS_Pulse-page-001
From Finance Unlocked for Nonprofits, available at http://www.wanonprofitinsitute.org/finance

3. Create accountability

So many boards have to unlearn bad habits that are getting in the way. Wouldn’t it be better if a new board could start in mission-strengthening routines? We are working on a new toolkit on how to start a nonprofit. I’ve made a list of habits would be helpful for board members to start with to avoid unlearning later on. Things like:

  • Start every meeting with a prompt that helps people to get to know each other.
  • Build 10 minutes of learning into every board meeting.
  • Give any volunteer  a job description. No matter how simple it is, write down what you think their job is.
  • Express gratitude before starting new business.


4. Reflect on rewards

The “reward differential” is the difference between what the old routine yielded vs. what is possible because of the new routine.

  • What do you now see or hear that is different?
  • How does that make you feel?
  • What might happen if you continued this new habit?
  • What would be helpful to expand the habit, if you want to?
  • How are you celebrating the change?

Habittracker




As we start a New Year, what habits do you want to change?

  1. What small, achievable actions can you commit to?
  2. What five times will you take that action?
  3. When will you reflect on what difference it makes?

P.S. Check out this awesome flowchart from Charles Duhigg.