Conferences

Conference Priming: Let’s Get Ready To Learn

“I recall that you had sent out (or more likely attached as a link) a really helpful worksheet to get the most of the conference. Could you send it to me? I’ve got some staff gearing up for state and national conferences this summer, and I’d like them to be much more focused on what they hope to learn and bring back. Just spending a few minutes with your worksheet helped me get more out of your conference.”  

I’ve been thinking a lot about the e-book, Conferences That Make A Difference, which I co-wrote with Mark Nilles. We have a webinar coming up on November 6, and so I’ve been reflecting on what big lessons I have learned since making the shift to seeing conferences as learning events. There are many.

The effort to paint our house with primer meant that the final coat of paint lasted much longer.

Priming is certainly at the top of the list. This is the practice of getting people ready to learn, through information, a planner, a reading list, or pre-conference connections with fellow participants. I picture myself as a child, watching my father slap primer on the clapboards of our 1840 Cape Cod home, ensuring that the paint would better hold on to the weather-worn wood. We have the ability as conference planners to dip our brushes into a paint can full of preparatory activities designed to bring our conferences into full and lasting color. 

One of the reasons why I appreciate priming so much is that it is as much about them as it is about my chance to engage in the content of the conference. I put logistics aside and indulge in the chance to read articles across the range of conference topics to curate a recommended reading list. I work with our graphic designer to create tools that inspire the artist in everyone. I play around with the narrative of the day in developing planning tools for individuals and teams. It’s creative work that rides on the  exhilaration that comes in anticipating the big event. It broadcasts to everyone coming that they are in a for a day that takes seriously its place in their larger learning calendar.

If you plan conferences—or regularly attend them—I hope you will consider joining Mark and me on November 6. We will be sharing our work on learningful conferences and engaging you in a conversation with colleagues from across the country. Register here

“Please thank your team for being so intentional in creating a great learning environment where people feel prepared and ready to learn.  It works so well when we ask ourselves, “What will great look like?/What do we want? For whom? What will it take? and What will this make possible?”

Conferences

Design a Learning-full Conference

A few years ago I attended a three-day conference in a city on the other side of the country. I took a lot of notes. I remember the speakers being interesting. I know that I left with a few ideas to dig into. Yet on the flight home, I misplaced my notebook. I tried to re-create my to-do list, but I drew a complete blank on the specifics of conference. I couldn’t remember what I heard or decided to do. I moved on.

The conference cost at least $1,000 to attend once I accounted for the flight, conference fee, and the pizza dinner I bought to thank my local host. A hotel would have rounded the cost up another $500. 

The conference cost the organizer a lot too! At least one staff member worked on the conference for six months, with the entire staff joining for the full three days. Money was spent on the venue, keynote speakers, and program. I’m sure sponsorships helped to offset some of these costs. The opportunity cost of doing a conference, however, includes all of the projects you would do if you had that time back. 

A lot is on the table when it comes to conferences, so let’s talk about how to design a learning-full conference. That’s a conference where people get the support they need before, during, and after the conference to reflect and act (even if they lose their notebook!). It is a conference that has adult learning principles baked into its design, helping people to process information, remember it, and connect it with action steps. It is a conference that stays with the attendee past the last session, placing the conference into a larger constellation of learning experiences. These are the kind of conferences that are worthy of the time and financial investments we make to move our people forward.

Click on the cover to download a copy.

This winter, Mark Nilles and I launched our new e-book on conference design, “Conferences That Make a Difference.” While there are several excellent resources for conference participants on how to make the most of attending a conference, this e-book looks at the other side of the equation: designing and delivering a conference. It gives ideas across four chapters:

  • Strategy and overall approach to conference design
  • Get Ready: Pre-Conference Activities
  • The Big Day: Deliver a Day that Makes a Difference
  • Make It Stick: Post-Conference Activities

We give you samples and tools to be able to implement what we are talking about right away.

If you design conferences, we hope this e-book gives you ideas. If you attend conferences, please feel free to send this to conference organizers. We might create a movement for better conferences everywhere!

Conferences

So Who’s In the Room? Moving On.

The presenter steps up to the podium, welcomes everyone to what will certainly be an awesome conference session. She segues into a typical warm-up exercise: let’s find out who is in the room.  How many of you are chickens?  Great, we appreciate the eggs. How many are cows?  Wonderful, thank you for your service—without you there would be no cheese or chocolate.  Do we have any alpaca in the room?  There you are. Few in number but mighty in spirit. Please don’t spit.

The exercise can happen in different ways, but the goal is the same: to build rapport and gather information about who is in the room so that you can better speak to them.

Or not.

At a recent conference session, some version of the above unfolded. The room was mostly filled with chickens—hard working creatures toiling hard to produce a golden egg. The presenter determined that right from the start. And then she spent the rest of the presentation speaking eloquently to an imagined audience of horses, delivering ideas and tools useful to running fast over hill and dale. Not so useful to chickens.

I sat in the audience trying to telepathically communicate with the chickens. I hoped that they were picking up nuggets of relevance between the lines. The session ended after its requisite 75 minutes. Before it did, I made some notes on how we could do this better:

  1. Know who is likely to be in the room before the session even begins. The attendee profile of most conferences isn’t a state secret, particularly for presenters who attend these conferences year after year. If you don’t know, ask the organizers. Optimize for the people most likely to be in the room.
  2. Influence who is in the room. At most conferences, anyone can attend any session, so how do you make sure your desired audience shows up? Invite them. When you write your conference description, include a clear description of who this workshop is designed for.
  3. Use your power as the holder of the microphone to connect people. Maybe you ask people new to the work to stand up so others can meet them later. Maybe you ask people to line up by years of experience and then “fold the line” to make pairs to answer a question related to what you are presenting. (I learned this from the awesome Tracy Flynn). There are many ways to connect people, and doing so strengthens your presentation.
  4. Customize in real time once you know who is in the room. By the time the presentation starts, your powerpoint and handouts are done. What isn’t done is how you deliver it. You have the power to shift your speed and focus through content depending on who is listening. You have the knowledge to stop and ask thought-provoking questions to get real-time engagement and feedback. You have the audience’s permission to adjust so that they get more out of their time with you.
  5. Stop talking. Let them play with your ideas. We hear all of the time about the importance of reflection. People need time to take what is going on in their heads and connect it to whatever you just said. They need to build a bridge between your idea and their lived experience. Presenters, therefore, need to build in time for people in the session to practice what they are hearing, share what they think about it, or otherwise exercise their brain. I know letting attendees talk introduces a certain level of chaos. Comfort with ambiguity is as great a skill in teaching as it is in life.

 


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